Koi

I recently started watching youtube videos about Koi, those insanely expensive carp from Japan. I think after hours and hours of experts explaining beauty and breeding, I think I roughly got the general idea. I’m still a hopeless amateur, of course, I don’t even know a fraction of what there is to know and I couldn’t evaluate the beauty of one Koi against the other even if my life depended on it. I just wanted to know how Koi are bred, how they are raised. I understood some of the citeria for beautiful fish, but that doesn’t mean I’m able to apply this very rough knowledge of mine.

That being said, let’s continue.

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Doitsu Kohaku der Konichi Koi Farm

In a way it’s no different than breeding a pure bred dog: you’re aiming to produce a creature that has very certain features we consider “beautiful”.  Breeding Koi does seem much more… heartless than breeding a dog or a cat. A carp lays thousands of eggs at once, a dog will have probably something between 3-10 puppies depending on the breed and how lucky the breeder was.

Therefore, you have a whole lot more babies to choose from when breeding fish and let me remind you this is entirely about beauty. You have this huge pool of offsprings and this is still a business. Businesses function after the laws of demand and suppy. People want beautiful Koi. A Koi that is not up to the standard is something nobody wants. It’s worthless to the point that you can’t sell it. People don’t want big ugly fish and Koi are big fish. Therefore, raising thousands of fish that are not up to the desired standard is a waste of money.

When breeding dogs, even the ugly ones usually somehow find a home and on average you will need to find homes for round about 5-6 puppies. That’s a whole lot easier than finding homes for 5-6 thousand fish of undesired color, pattern and body structure. As you can imagine, Koi are being selected very very strictly. Farms don’t want to waste money on raising ugly fish nobody wants. So what happens with the undesired fish? I’m not 100% sure, but I read somewhere the undesired ones from early selections are used as food for the bigger ones.

A beautiful Koi is being treated like royalty, an ugly Koi (which is most of them) is not

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Karashigoi der Konichi Koi Farm

even worth living. I understand why Koi farmers do what they do, it just seems very extreme, especially at the stage of the very early selections where most of the Koi are being selected out. After they’ve reached a certain age and size and survived a few round of selections, farms will keep the “Tategoi” (the best ones) and sell the rest off, but they can’t do this at the early selections.

Breeding Koi is basically a game of luck you play with nature. You produce a whole damn lot of something in the hopes of getting a substainable amount of good individuals, a couple of great ones and maybe one champion. The rest, the thousands of siblings not good enough, are an unwanted byproduct.

Koi are extreamly beautiful fish. Chances are very high I will never have a Koi pond, but I can’t help being fascinated by these carp. The strict selections, the harsh nature of their breeding, the insane care the good ones receive, it’s all part of the fascination of Japan’s (and maybe the world’s) most beautiful fish.

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Girls of the Wild’s

158693lGirls of the Wild’s is a Manhwa fully colored and published online. It’s about Jae Gu Song, a poor guy who has to take care of his younger siblings after their mother left them due to personal problems regarding the recent death of their father.

So in other words: he’s head poor and needs to go to school while working. After Middle School he decided to go to a formerly Girls-only-School nearby, because he was given a scholarship simply for being there and ended up as the only male student in the entire school.

This school is special, though. It’s all about martial arts and the students are ridiculously strong – mind you, they’re all girls, except our main character, who feels terribly out of place, because he can’t do any fighting at all. He’s even been bullied during his Middle School days and meets his bullies again, getting nothing but a beating out of it.

He befriends the president of the Taekwondo Club and S-class-student, Dal Dal Choi, a cute and small girl with deadly kicks. At first she wanted to befriend Jae Gu, because it was said to bring her points for her grades, but she developes a huge crush on him and follows him around everywhere.

Another friend of his is Moon Young Lee, president of the Boxing Club and S-class student, as well as close friend of In Gyi Yoon (“Queen”). She has a crush on him at first, but later moves on to another guy.

The third and last of his main group of friends is Queen Yoon, she’s not in a specific club, but an S-class-student as well.She’s close friends with Moon Young and the strongest fighter at Wild’s high and won last year’s “Wirld’s League” with no problem at all. She’s very cold and starts out on the wrong foot with Jae Gu, but later develops romantic feeling for him.

In an act of revenge, Queen chose Jae Gu as her first opponent in this year’s Wild’s League, however since she doesn’t need to go through the prelims, Jae Gu would need to win those first. His initial idea was to simply forfeight the first fight and therefore get out this dilemma unharmed. He eventually decides to take the prelims seriously and learns basic fighting moves in Boxing and a few simple kicks from Dal Dal and Moon Young.

This is the basic overview. Interestingly, though, MAL lists this manga as a harem, 80467lsomething I don’t quite agree on, because it’s more a love triangle than a real harem, especially since Moon Yong drops out, what leaves only Dal Dal and Queen. Sure, the rest of the school is still kind of interested, since they get points for being close to him, but the story doesn’t really care about that at all.

I usually don’t like harems. I have a soft spot in my heart for Love Hina, because it’s the mother of all harem manga, but it’s not just random girls throwing themselves onto the main character. It does have a very clear main pairing and above everything else, is really fun to read. I don’t see this manhwa as a real “harem”, even though the set up smells a lot like it. It’s really not.

So if you don’t like harem, don’t worry, there’s not much harem in here. Would I recommend this Manhwa? Sure, why not. It’s fun seeing the girls being the strong ones for once and Qeens younger brother is really funny. It’s a good read.